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to have stopped. u.s. president barack obama welcomed the news but warned this is not a permanent solution and an enormous cleanup still lies ahead. >> the undersea flow has been stopped for now. after almost three months, there is no sign of oil leaking out. tests are still under way, but hopes are rising the new metal cap can contain the massive pressure and put an end to the worst spill in u.s. history. >> we will do lots of analysis to make sure it looks like everything is as it should be. i think it is going to be several more days. we need to be cautious right now. it is a great site, but it is far from the finish line. >> president obama warned the cap is not a permanent solution. >> even if a shut-in is not possible, this new cap and the additional equipment being placed in the gulf will be able to contain up to 80,000 barrels per day, which should allow us to capture nearly all the will until the well is killed. >> even if the cap does hold, it is a temporary solution. bp has to seal off the lead permanently, and that will not happen until relief wells are complete in august. mill
. it establishes european parliamentary system. six suicide bombers stormed a u.s. aid compound in northern afghanistan early today. at least four other people were killed. none of them americans. two were wounded. the taliban claimed responsibility. meantime, general petraeus arrived in kabul. he is taking over u.s. and nato operations in afghanistan, following the resignation of general stanley mcchrystal last week. media reports say iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad wants to ban signature western products such as coca-cola. in retaliation for new sanctions against his nuclear program. chief washington correspondent jim angle looks at the latest effort to put the squeeze on iran. >> reporter: president obama now signed a bipartisan bill passed by congress to tighten sanctions on iran in hopes to deter the nuclear program. >> there should be no doubt the united states and the international community are determined to prevent iran from acquiring nuclear weapons. >> the u.s. action follows u.n. security council passage of additional sanctions in early june and the u.s. sanctions build on
are fueling new suspicion and outrage about pakistan's links to the taliban. is a key u.s. ally playing a role in the deaths of american troops? i'm going to ask pakistan's ambassador to the u.s. about these disturbing allegations. >>> and the case of the disappearing oil. why officials in the gulf say they are not finding much crude left on the water surface? wolf blitzer is off today. i'm suzanne malveaux and you're in "the situation room." >>> well, some are calling it one of the biggest leaks in u.s. military history. in the league of the pentagon papers. those revelations about the vietnam war. but today the white house contends that there isn't much new in the thousands of afghan war logs posted online by the group wikileaks. some powerful members of congress, well, they're not so sure. they say the documents raised some serious questions about u.s. policy toward afghanistan and neighboring pakistan. i want to begin with our senior white house correspondent ed henry and what was startling and what was -- stood out in my mind when i saw the white house today was that they are not saying t
to be sputtering? arizona governor fires back over immigration. a tribute to the longest serving senator in u.s. history raises eyebrows. from the studio in washington, this is "special report." i'm bret baier. we begin on the fox news job hunt with the june unemployment numbers. national jobless rate declined from 9.7% to 9.5%. president obama declared the economy headed in the right direction but as correspondent james rosen reports other numbers offer evidence of a darker view. >> the economy created 600,000 private sector job this year. start turn around from last year when we lost 3.7 million jobs in height of the recession. >> reporter: that was one way of reading a labor department june employment data. here is another. private sector added 83,000 jobs last month. on the plus side of the ledger to be sure, but 25% short of what the analysts predicted. the three-month average for job growth in the private sector, which reached 154,000 from february to april now stands at 119,000. unmistakable sign the recovery is losing steam. >> i think what you are seeing is what a fact of life about re
technology require a new level in the u.s.- israel cooperation. the rockets with better guidance system and greater range are spreading across the region. hamas has a substantial number of rockets in gaza. they all pose a serious danger. these and other threats to israel's civilian population are real and growing. they must be addressed. we are standing shoulder to shoulder with our israeli partners to do so. coming into my current job after eight years with senator clinton, i can attest to hurt deep sense of pride in being a strong voice for israel. i travel to israel with senator clinton in 2005. i join her on her first visit to israel as secretary of state in march of 2009. when it comes to the u.s.-israel relationship, the policy guidance secretary clinton has given me is no different from the guidance she gave me when i worked for her in the senate. in a recent speech, she asked me, coming from this experience of working with her, to make the management of our security relationship with israel preserving israel's military edge among my top priorities. the unique relationship betwee
physical with the u.s. over sanctions. there is a rosy picture of economic progress but are they looking at rose-colored glasses? and some climb on board to extend bush era tax cuts. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report". good evening. i'm bret baier. pentagon officials say they plan to conduct military exercises with south korea despite a threat from the north of what it calls a physical response. the drills and the north's reaction to them, both grow out of accusations that north korea was responsible for the sinking of a south korean warship in march. tensions are rising tonight. national correspondent steve centanni has the story from the pentagon. >> reporter: with military hardware in place for a pointed show of force off the kore korean peninsula, harsh words remain the weapon of choice. at asian security conference in hanoi, vietnam, they condemned the military exercises and issued this threat -- >> it will be physical, respon response. it's no longer the 19th century, which -- [inaudible ] >> but the diplomacy it is. the exercises include the giant u.s. ai
they're raising new questions about u.s. military strategy and whether pakistan, america's critical ally in the region, has been aiding the enemy. a live report is just ahead. >>> fast moving storms spawning tornadoes and cutting paths of destruction from the midwest to the northeast. homes have been torn apart and trees knocked down. live in the extreme weather center with where the threat is this morning. >>> and the "a.m. fix" blog is up and running. join the live conversation right now. just go to >>> but first, day 98 of the gulf oil spill and it may be tony hayward's last. the company could announce that he is done during a keyboard meeting in london today. many residents of the gulf coast say his words were salt on an already gushing wound and he became the poster boy for bad press saying the spill was relatively tiny, the environmental impact would be small, that he wanted his own life back when 1 people died in the initial disaster. phil beck is live at bp headquarters in london in morning. do we know if we're going to hear anything about tony hayward's futur
. a complex u.s.-russia spy swap was underway late today, involving ten russian agents here and four people convicted of espionage in russia. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the action in a new york court today and look at russia's deep-cover spy program. >> lehrer: then, we talk to white house chief of staff, rahm emanuel. >> woodruff: tom bearden reports from the gulf of mexico, where scientists are turning to tiny microbes to help clean up oiled marshland. >> lehrer: margaret warner examines the pentagon's new rules for dealing with the news media. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown has a conversation with jean- michel cousteau about his famous father-- ocean explorer jacques cousteau. >> when people ask what do you expect to find? he would always say if i knew, i wouldn't go. so it was the sense of discovery which is, obviously, related it to adventure. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the engine that connects abundant grain from the american heartland
lowest level in months. materials and metal makers were hardest hit over fears of weakening u.s. demand.thin mont. materials and metal makers were hardest hit over fears of weakening u.s. demansin months. materials and metal makers were hardest hit over fears of weakening u.s. demann months. materials and metal makers were hardest hit over fears of weakening u.s. deman months. materials and metal makers were hardest hit over fears of weakening u.s. deman materials and metal makers were hardest hit over fears of weakening u.s. deman materials and metal makers were hardest hit over fears of weakening u.s. deman. materials and metal makers were hardest hit over fears of weakening u.s. demand. elsewhere overseas, some good news for u.s. private equity firms carlyle group and tpg. the two won a bidding war for healthscope in a deal worth $1.7 million. >>> a government watchdog is criticizing the treasury department for urging general motors and chrysler to drastically downsize their dealerships during the recession without weighing the consequences. the report says the treasury's decisions m
of spying for the west in exchange for the suspects arrested in the u.s. the climate conundrum. some of the world's most influential scientists are clear of hiding key data to exaggerate global warming. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. my name is mike embly. coming up -- the israeli group is proving a big hit in broadway and london. and fighting for a place for the final, germany and spain are head to head in the world cup semis. britain has confirmed its troops are being moved out in the african province of hellmund, where they have taken casualties. thared of all losses have been there. american forces will take over. it's been described as a redeployment. the taliban are likely to portray it as a victory for them. bbc correspondent jonathan beal has this report. >> it's one of the most lethal places on the planet. this is sangy, scene of the heaviest british fighting and where they suffered the heaviest casualties. is this small stretch of lush, greenland is also fertile ground for drug smuggling corruption and the
at the u.s. justice department from 2000-2006. currently senior director for mississippi river and east coast center for rivers and deltas, part of the environmental defense fund, senior direct there are. and as we look at restoration, mr. harrison, what's the prescription from your area? if you don't quite know how bad it is yet, how are you going to get your head around how to restore things? what's your process going to be? guest: well, one of the things that people need to remember about the louisiana wetlands in particular and the gulf of mexico is that these are places where environmental damage has been happening for the past 80, 100 years. you can take the louisiana wetlands, for example, because we made some decisions on how we manage the mississippi river, the wetlands are actually the delta of the mississippi river. this is where the river comes down, it's draining 41% of the united states, it's eroding all that land and sediment. and it buills this land mass, where new orleans sits. it's where the fishing communities are. and it's an ongoing battle between the gulf of mexico
the united states and russia. stand by. the defense secretary reveals his choice to be the new head of the u.s. military's central command. it's a u.s. marine general who once said it's fun to shoot some people. this hour the pentagon's problem. military brass with loose lips, and republican party chairman michael steele insists he's 100% behind the u.s. troops, but is that enough to satisfy conservatives who say it's past time for him to go. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> well, let's begin with the breaking news right now. all ten russian suspects appearing in a new york court pleaded guilty just a little while ago in connection with the stunning spy case, and now after days of speculation about a possible spy swap between the united states and russia, we've learned how the exchange is about to play out. let's bring in our foreign affairs correspondent jill doherty. she's got new information just coming in. jill, tell us what you know. >> reporter: right. wolf, this is -- we just got this. it's from the u.s. justice department, and this is a letter from the justice depa
will be very narrow and it's not even clear if it will pass. >> u.s. timid point out many industries and economies want an economy-wide cap and trade system so they know there are certainties about the system. does that mean that under current law that the epa could step in and say we're going to regulate transportation? >> that is exactly what is happening already. the epa is moving to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. they just announced and finalize regulations covering greenhouse gas emissions from automobiles. they have announced plans to go forward with regulations that would cover power plants. other industries. they're moving that direction. those regulations are likely to be more costly because the epa is not the expert on which technology is the best, they're just going to say you have to meet this emissions reduction and it will be much more expensive. >> could you want our viewers through what an energy-only bill looks like if they can't even do -- which it sells like it will be able to do -- cap and trade on utilities, if they can't do that, what does an energy-only bil
because the turks have been very upset with the u.s. policy toward iran. they see it as too confrontational. the problem is that the americans are not in an advice- taking mode. actually we're not very good at taking advice in general. we're actually used to giving advice. the idea that we should have partners in the middle east who have other ideas about how to approach the crises there. we should maybe adjust our policies according to what our friends in the neighborhood suggest. it's something we're just not ready for. and so senator kerry on the broadcast here recently said to me, you know, turkey speaks to and has resonance with the arab street today, number one. number two, they're in a contest for leadership in the arab world. >> you're absolutely right. i wouldn't say just the arab world but the whole middle east. turkey is now able to play a role that no other country can play. how did turkey get to this position? because it's only been ten years that turkey has been really active in the world. before that turkey was just the loyal faithful foot soldier of the u.s.
on all that's gone wrong. mounting u.s. casualties, civilian casualties, afghan government corruption and claims that pakistan is helping the taliban. >> the fact is the revelation of these documents, these raw reports real he'll brings to the foreall of the core challenges that we've been facing in afghanistan for a number of years. >> reporter: the war funding bill now goes to the president for his signature, but it only funds the war for a few months so another big battle over paying for the war in afghanistan is just around the corner, katie. >> couric: this question probably reflects what a lot of americans are wondering given the fact that the u.s. gives pakistan billions of dollars in aid every year. that is, can pakistan even be called a partner at this point? >> well, despite all those claims in the wikileaks documents the white house says yes. number one they say because relations have improved significantly over the last year. number two, they say because no other country has done as much to help the united states eliminate al qaeda terrorists from the battlefield. katie. >
and adapting our responses to the threats that we're facing. >> does the u.s. integrate the tools of peace building into its statecraft? when do challenges like poverty, disease and climate change become issues of national security? and what role can global institutions and civil society organizations play in supporting government led efforts? next, on great decisions. >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. join us as we discuss today's most critil global issues. join us as we discuss today's most critil global issues. join us for great decisions. [instrumental music] >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about the world. funding for great decisions is provided by the carnegie corporation of new york, the starr foundation, shell international, and the european commission. great decisions is produced in association with the university of delaware. >> and now from our studios, here is ralph begleiter. >> welcome to great decisions. i'm ralph begleiter. joining us to discuss peace building and statecra
the u.s. and israel agree it's time for tas for -- face to face peace talks between israel hes and palestinians but several sticking points remain, including border security and israeli settlements. senior white house correspondent major garrett is reporting live on the north lawn. major, is it oversimplifying things to say this new phase of the obama-netanyahu relationship will be sealed with a photograph? >> reporter: it really isn't, jon. the last time prime minister netanyahu was at the white house there were no photographs, no press coverage of the meetings and that created the atmosphere that tph*epb yahoo and president obama did not agree on fundamental issues crucial to the u.s.-israeli relationship. both sides tried to paper over the differences but without any sort of publicly visual express of support, there was a moment for both countries to say wait a minute this relationship may be getting off track and what we had moments arc the israeli prime minister arriving precisely on time, driving from the blair house where he's saying to see president obama. we'll see the
. president obama led a chorus of concern over the huge disclosure of classified u.s. military documents about the war in afghanistan. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, two takes on the document dump. first, senators jack reed and kit bond assess what it could mean for the war effort. >> lehrer: then, judy woodruff talks to david leigh of the "guardian" and media watcher alex jones on the journalism impact. >> ifill: holly pattenden of "business monitor international" in london looks at the corporate shake-up at b.p. >> lehrer: tom bearden reports from the alabama gulf coast on kenneth feinberg and the complicated mission of compensation. >> and the lead is still tied up they still compensation hasn't been forth coming. >> when i was a young person working in these places, didn't see a way out. and i certainly didn't think the way out would be this. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corpor
until i have confidence that u.s. taxpayer money is not being abused to line the pockets of corrupt afghan government officials, g drug lords and terrorists. can you respond, first of all, to the allegation that people with political connections are getting off? >> that's not true. we have prosecuted a number of high ranking officials in the afghan government. that process will continue. every government official, high ranking official is now required to -- there's a lot of misinformation. for instance, that report by nita lowey tt came out was related to the flow of cash out of kabul airport. the fact is that out of the $19.6 million that the united states is giving to afghanistan in the past three years, only $1 billi billion, 5% of the money has been given to the afghan government. there is waste. there is corruption. but a lot of it has nothing to do with the afghan government. it is the -- >> what's worrisome, i think, to congress, to americans, is that it's not, oh, there's corruption in government. because governments do have their corruption parts. it's that the president
with the advocacy group, invisible children. this senseless act of violence should serve as a wake-up call to u.s. officials on the need to vigorously address the threat of islamist extremism wherever it lurks. which extends far beyond the middle east. many more lives are at stake. the 1998 east africa embassy attacks exposed and the july 11 kampala attacks affirmed that the united states cannot afford to ignore the activities of extremist groups in africa as they attempt to expand their influence to bolster their ranks and spread their dangerous ideology. we must work vigilantly and cooperatively with other responsible nations to disrupt the operations of extremist groups and hold accountable their regional sponsors. over 18 months ago, mr. speaker, i introduced a resolution, h.con.res. 16, which brings sorely needed attention to the threat of islamic extremism in africa. it is alarming that even after these tragic attacks i have not been able to get the majority to bring this resolution to the floor. i understand that attorney general holder is currently in uganda attending the african union su
and getting a lay of the land. following that, he wept to the u.s. embassy for fourth of july celebrations a day before the actual american independence day. that's where he and u.s. ambassador, karl eikenberry welcomed and greeted several hundred dignitaries. he spoke to the crowd and said a united front must be met to have success in the war in afghanistan. >> i'm reminded that this is an effort in which we must achieve unity of effort and common purpose. civilian and military, afghan and international, we are part of one theme with one mission. in this important endeavor, cooperation is not optional. this is a tough mission. there is nothing easy about it. >> following the embassy event, general petraeus met with his top commanders here on the ground in afghanistan to assess the situation. his most important meeting of the day is that with the afghan president, hamid karzai. he needs to build a very strong relationship to show a unite td front between the nato coalition and the afghan government. president karzai had a very strong relationship with the former top commander, general stan
might remember hearing a lot about the marja operation in mid-february. intense combat lead by u.s. marines and british troops and afghan forces to be followed by what general mcchrystal called a government in a box. rolling out governance after the combat. government in a box hasn't worked out that way. it hasn't stood out by any means. security isn't established, and people siding with the afghan government there have been threatened and targeted up to and including assassination. kandahar has been portrayed in the press as the twin operation to marha. twin but bigger. the line i raerd is since marja isn't a success, at least yet, maybe ever, the same type of operation in kandahar has been delayed. that's what it seemed like at home, at least to me before i got here. here it does not seem like that. here it's clear that kandahar isn't delayed. it's well under way. they're not blowing things up in kandahar. they're doing things like opening police stations. let me show you some of that instead of trying to explain it. we flew in a blackhawk helicopter with general hodges to a base
of mexico. >>> all right. this fourth of july holiday weekend, a surprise for u.s. troops in iraq. a visit from vice president joe biden and his wife jill. the couple's visit comes as american troops are scheduled to draw down in iraq late next month. here's more from baghdad. >> reporter: it was especially surprising that vice president biden was accompanied by his wife, jill biden. the two will be spending the fourth of july with the troops attending a number of events. vice president biden will be meeting with senior iraqi government officials as well as the political leadership here. iraq has been in a state of political chaos, deadlocked since the march inconclusive elections, unable to form a new government. this is causing some concern as the political vacuum created could be manipulate bid insurgents trying to regain their foothold. mrs. biden will be meeting with the troops as well as civilian embassy officials and she's going to be conducting a roundtable with iraqi women who teach english. there is also a delegation of u.s. senators made up of mccain, lieberman and graham. they
in the u.s. house. >> military experts tell us that it could take up to 10 more years to achieve an acceptable outcome in afghanistan. we have already been there for nine years. i believe that it is too high of a price to take -- toay. for those that say we must pay it because we are going after al qaeda, afghanistan is where al qaeda used to beat off. today there are fewer than 100 al qaeda in afghanistan, which was confirmed last night -- last month by the cia chief. they have relocated to other countries and regions. i yield myself an addional minute. i have the utmost respect for our troops, who have done everything asked of them. but they are being let down by the inability of the government of afghanistan and in some instances, pakistan, to do their part. i would be willing to support additional war funding provided that congress would vote, up or down, explicitly on whether or not to continue this policy after a new national intelligence estimate is produced. absent that discipline, i cannot but my constituentsin the eye to say that this operation will hurt our enemies mor
, including u.s. troops overseas. as we reported yesterday, vice president joe biden has made a surprise visit to the american forces in iraq. biden is there working to end a political stalemate ahead of the planned withdrawal of u.s. combat forces. andrea mitchell is traveling with the vice president. good morning. >> reporter: alex, good morning. happy fourth of july to you from baghdad, where vice president joe biden and his wife, jill, are naturalizing 153 u.s. troops who are becoming u.s. citizens today. what better day to do it than on july 4th. also a serious mission here, political and diplomatic. the vice president is trying to push the iraqis all of the factions that have been arguing since election four months ago, trying to push them toward a permanent government. the importance of that is that the u.s. combat mission is scheduled to end on august 31st. and a troop draw-down of u.s. forces to 50,000. currently it's 82,000. still, optimistic, the vice president says that everything is proceeding on that timetable. officials traveling with him say that the combat mission will be turn
some of the money to groups promoting the bill. it's illegal under the u.s. la for the government to lobby for or against abortion in foreign countries. >> back here at home, the spokesman confirmed that the new federal regulations will require healthcare providers to have technology enabling them to calculate a person body mass index. which is used to determine obesity. b.m.i. is a relationship between height and weight and the stimulus package requires providers to have the height and weight information stored electronically and available on new exchange. new test results are in for the temporary fix of the well cap in the gulf. officials say it's good news, worries still persist over potential leaks. correspondent william la jeunesse is here with an update. good evening. >> since capping the well, they expected increase in pressure from methane. they expected the 2500 pounds per square inch, they got 6700. so while there is no evidence of a leak, there is ambiguity of the finding. what does it mean for the gulf? more uncertainty. >> until it's stopped permanently, i have no tru
will also be live in the gulf of mexico to get live reaction. >> thank you, david. the u.s. military in iraq has been strongly criticized for failing to account properly for billions of dollars received to help build the country. a federal watchdog says that 96% of the funds are unaccounted for. i asked our correspondent about how much money is missing. >> $8.7 billion according to this report here. the u.s. apartment of the fence 's financial management control was unable to properly account for $8.7 billion out of $9.1 billion for funds received it for development in iraq. this was money that came from the proceeds of the sale of iraqi oil and gas and some from the frozen assets of the saddam hussein era. submitted between 2004 and 2007 for reconstruction projects. >> nato forces in afghanistan have recovered the remains of one of two american servicemen that when missing last friday after driving out of the military base without an escort. afghan officials said that negotiations are still ongoing for the release of the second man. >> negotiation, since the capture of the men on friday, ha
-military spending in to that bill. the u.s. trade deficit widened by 4.8% in may to $42.3 billion. that's the highest level in 18 months. job openings dropped in may to $3.3 million to $3.2 million. layoffs were up slightly. wall street hot streak continued today. dow gained 146 3/4. s&p 500 added more than 16 1/2. the nasdaq was up 43 2/3. federal judge in new york cleared for trial the first guantanamo bay detainee to be prosecuted in a civilian court. the judge ruled that galahni's five-year detention and two-year interrogation were not grounds for dismissal. the mental image many people have of the guantanamo bay facility is probably pretty grim. national correspondent catherine herridge shows us tonight reality is quite different. >> detainee dumping the dirt is actually gardening. for the 181 detainees remaining at guantanamo bay, the quality of life is apparently improving. playstation, board games, nintendo, there are more ways than ever to pass the time. popular titles in the library include harry potter and "twilight" a series about teen angst and vampires. by contrast, convic
illegal immigration. the u.s. justice department has, indeed, filed a lawsuit that challenges the state of arizona's tough new immigration law. the measure set to go into effect later this month. the law requires local police to question possible illegal immigrants and also makes it a crime for legal immigrants not to carry their documents. the obama administration argues federal law trumps the state law. the president himself called this plan misguided and one senior justice department official said today that allowing it opens the door for a patchwork of immigration laws across the country. we think that is untenable. but supporters say they need this law because they claim the feds haven't done enough to stop illegal immigration. the arizona governor jan brewer who signed this bill into law released a statement that reads, in part, today's filing is nothing more than a massive waste of taxpayer funds. these funds could be better used against the violent mexican cartels than the people of arizona. anita vogel on fox top story in our northwest newsroom. strong reaction from arizona law
been firing heat-seeking surface-to-air-missiles at nato and u.s. heblgt hechts. we hear the civilian death toll is of higher than reported by military troops in the field. there's a shadowy covert operation going on to kill taliban leaders. a shoot to kill by a group call ed task force 37 3. and that the pakistan's isi has been helping the taliban kill u.s. troops and others, larry. >> larry: is all this new to you, nick? >> you know, a lot of this we've heard before. one analyst put it this way to me. he said, this is old bad news at a new bad time. what he means is we've heard a lot of this before, but it comes at a very, very difficult moment. some of these allegations, the allegations of pakistani intelligence services, aiding the taliban, we've heard details about that before. we've heard details, speculation that the civilian death toll is much higher than has been initially reported. but it's the timing that it comes at, when there are so many questions about the war in afghanistan, and it is in the granular detail in all these documents that people are only now just beginning
more u.s. soldiers were killed in afghanistan in the last 24 hours, bringing the total to 66 for july-- the most in a single month since the war began. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, ray suarez talks to two veterans of the iraq and afghanistan conflicts about the continued challenge from deadly roadside bombs or i.e.d.s-- the number one killer of americans. >> lehrer: we explore the latest mix of economic numbers and the prospects for the auto industry with business reporter micki maynard and economist martin bailey. >> woodruff: david brooks and ruth marcus, sitting in for mark shields, present their analysis of the week's news. ♪ >> lehrer: and sting with strings. jeffrey brown talks to rock star sting about his newest musical challenge-- performing with a 45 piece orchestra. >> the royal if i ma mar:-- philharmonic is a serious orchestra. so in a way it does flatter my ego but also i have to step up to the plate and... and you know, so it's a big challenge for me. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newsho
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 523 (some duplicates have been removed)